Why the future will be better

23 Sep

Regular readers of this blog may note a recurring theme in the discussion of where advertising seems to be going, based on changes in the media, the technology that accesses them, how we use both, and therefore – from a social and business perspective – how we interact with brands.

While it’s all a lot to handle at once, I would argue that we’re also better off for it. Progress and change is good, as long as it’s grounded in sustainability.

I don’t see anything wrong with consumers finally getting to hold businesses accountable and recalibrating the traditional balance of power. It’s good that our technology is moving us away from over-consumption of our scarce natural resources. It’s sustainable that an iPhone can replace 5 or 6 appliances in one sharp smack.

Don’t you think, overall, we’re getting it right?

Throughout human history there have been people who feared and decried the future. But things seem to be getting better. Constantly.

Personal accountability is up. We’re trying to even out discrimination based on colour, sexual orientation, age and religion. We’re giving up smoking. We’re eating healthier. We’re seeing more of the world, which is breaking down old cultural barriers and ignorance.

In the big picture, across every possible metric, from life expectancy and infant mortality, (these two seem to drive a lot of the imperative for change) to the efficiency of food production, to the amount of man-hours it takes to create the products we use…from the First World to developing nations, things are improving. We’re redressing the over-indulgence of recent human history.

Of course, it’s far from a perfect world. But isn’t change taking us in the right direction?

High-five change.

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4 Responses to “Why the future will be better”

  1. Reg September 23, 2010 at 9:26 am #

    Good on you, Doug — a nice ray of sunshine (as the artist’s rendering reflects) for my day. You’re right, it’s not a perfect world, but too often we can focus on the negative while ignoring the positive. Change is, or at least should be, on the whole, good. Half the time it’s how we deal with it that is most telling.

    Safe travels to the beautiful NWT.

  2. dougbrowncreative September 23, 2010 at 10:04 am #

    Hey Reg, it’s such a relief not to have to think of a clever counter argument for some flaw you’ve exposed in my thinking! 😉 Glad you agree and I appreciate the comment.

  3. manu September 23, 2010 at 10:12 am #

    Hi Doug,

    This is a belated response to your rant against stupid advertising.

    The Mars Thins commercial is a classic. In all my years in the business in different countries, this is the one script treatment I’ve heard at least a thousand times.

    Open a perfectly ordinary day.

    A young (man/woman) walks down a street and pops Product (gum/yogurt/chocolate/candy) in his/her mouth and suddenly gets ENERGIZED!

    Everyone on the street starts dancing.

    Pack shot, Logo.

    Another classic is the Swiffer campaign. I have actually started having conversations with my broom on the sly (Don’t tell the Swiffer people I own a Vileda).

    • dougbrowncreative September 23, 2010 at 10:24 am #

      I think the future will also be better when advertisers stop treating consumers like morons. The consumer is not an moron, David Ogilvy said. She is your wife. Glad to hear you hate the Mars thin commercial as much as I do Manu. Isn’t advertising FUN!

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